Campbell speaks about U.S. Senate runoff against Kennedy

Campbell speaks about U.S. Senate runoff against Kennedy
All that separated District 5 Public Service Commissioner Foster L. Campbell Jr., a Bossier City Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, a Lafayette Republican, on Tuesday was about 30,000 votes.
All that separated District 5 Public Service Commissioner Foster L. Campbell Jr., a Bossier City Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, a Lafayette Republican, on Tuesday was about 30,000 votes.
"You can't fix stupid, but you can sure vote it out," Louisiana Treasurer John Neely Kennedy said Nov. 8 after claiming a spot in the U.S. Senate runoff Dec. 10. (Source: KSLA News 12)
"You can't fix stupid, but you can sure vote it out," Louisiana Treasurer John Neely Kennedy said Nov. 8 after claiming a spot in the U.S. Senate runoff Dec. 10. (Source: KSLA News 12)

(KSLA) - Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell addressed the media Wednesday morning about moving on to the U.S. Senate runoff Dec. 10.

Campbell spoke at 10:30 a.m. at the Hilton Baton Rouge Capitol Conference Center.

He will face Louisiana Treasurer John Neely Kennedy. Kennedy is the front-runner, according to complete but unofficial results from the secretary of state's office.

With 99 percent of the vote counted, the Baton Rouge Republican has 25 percent of the votes cast Tuesday.

The decision on the face off between the two came down to a few thousand votes. That's all that separated District 5 Public Service Commissioner Foster L. Campbell Jr., a Bossier City Democrat, and U.S. Rep. Charles Boustany, a Lafayette Republican.

With the votes in all but 22 of Louisiana's 3,904 precincts counted, Campbell was leading Boustany 17 percent to 16 percent. That's a difference of 33,050 votes.

"It was a good moment. We fought a hard race. We had stiff opposition that we won't have next time," Campbell told supporters at his watch party Tuesday night, adding that he looks forward to a vigorous runoff campaign against Kennedy.

Throughout his campaign, Campbell marketed himself as a champion who for decades has fought for the working class.

He's in his third term representing the 2 dozen North Louisiana parishes in the PSC's 5th District. That term expires Dec. 31, 2020.

Kennedy, whose fourth term as Louisiana treasurer expires Jan. 13, 2020, has campaigned on the premise that Washington, D.C., politicians should be replaced because they have misspent taxpayer money and haven't listened to voter concerns.

"You can't fix stupid, but you can sure vote it out," he said Tuesday night, wasting no time in launching his 33-day runoff campaign.

This year marks the third time Kennedy has attempted to gain a U.S. Senate seat. This campaign comes in the wake of unsuccessful bids for Louisiana attorney general in 1991 and U.S. senator in 2004 and 2008.

Boustany talked of getting results despite partisanship.

Those 3 are among 5 candidates whom polls, including ones commissioned by KSLA/Raycom Media and UNO, showed as possible contenders in the U.S. Senate runoff.

The others included U.S. Rep. Dr. John Fleming, a Minden Republican who eschewed a re-election bid and instead ran for the Senate seat, and lawyer Caroline Fayard. Fayard got 12 percent of the votes cast Tuesday. Fleming had 10 percent.

Throughout his campaign, Fleming proclaimed that the system is rigged and touted himself as the only true conservative among the 5 major candidates.

Fayard previously has run but never has held political office. In particular, the Baton Rouge Democrat gained attention in 2010 for her strong showing against Jay Dardenne in the race to be Louisiana's lieutenant governor.

Fleming already has conceded the race.In this U.S. Senate race, Fayard has described her opponents as career politicians and has positioned herself as a fresh face for Congress.

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