Supreme court rejects LA inmate's death penalty challenge

Supreme court rejects LA inmate's death penalty challenge
18-year-old Tavia Sills was found shot to death in a pond in a remote area in Shreveport's Martin Luther King Jr. neighborhood in September 2008. She was 4 months pregnant. (Source: Vickie Britton)
18-year-old Tavia Sills was found shot to death in a pond in a remote area in Shreveport's Martin Luther King Jr. neighborhood in September 2008. She was 4 months pregnant. (Source: Vickie Britton)

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) - The U.S. Supreme Court has rejected a Louisiana inmate's appeal to consider a nationwide ban on the death penalty.

Louisiana death row inmate Lamondre Tucker challenged capital punishment as unconstitutional, but wasn't successful in his attempt.

Tucker is convicted of killing 18-year-old Tavia Sills and her unborn child nearly 8 years ago in Shreveport.

"My first thought was 'oh my God, I can't believe he is doing this, he killed my daughter, Tavia is gone," recalled Vickie Britton.

Britton said one phone call changed her entire day after learning that the man convicted of shooting and killing her pregnant daughter tried to challenge the death penalty. But, that challenge was turned down Tuesday.

"I understand you're trying to save your life, but the fact is, you took my daughter's life. She can't be replaced. You took my grandson's life, he can't be replaced," said Britton.

Sills was killed in 2008 and Britton said Tucker, Sills' ex-boyfriend, even helped search for the teenager.

"What he did to my daughter was kind of a satanic type thing, it was unreal, unbelievable," said Britton. "She was in the water 3 days and 3 nights."

Sills body was found in a pond off of Legardy St. in Shreveport in September of 2008.

Britton says she believes Tucker is a cold and calculated killer who needs to stop trying to dodge the death penalty.

"Basically see him constantly denying what he did, it's very painful," explained Britton.

The grieving mother said the only thing keeping her from closure is Tucker accepting his role in the crime once and for all.

"I just want you to own up to what you did and accept your punishment. I understand it's his life, but it was Tavia's life too," said Britton.

Instead of thinking of saving his own life, Britton wants Tucker to take responsibility for the lives he's convicted of cutting short.

Britton said she was disappointed that she learned of the news through social media and word of mouth instead of being contacted by the court system regarding the matter.

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