Glenn Ford compensation case to be in appeals court Monday

Glenn Ford compensation case to be in appeals court Monday
Glenn Ford, moments after walking out of Angola State Penitentiary in 2014 (Source: KSLA News 12)
Glenn Ford, moments after walking out of Angola State Penitentiary in 2014 (Source: KSLA News 12)

LOUISIANA (KSLA) - Exonerated death row inmate Glenn Ford may be gone, but his compensation fight is still very much alive.

Ford was released from prison in 2014 after prosecutors said they had information clearing him of a 1983 murder of a Shreveport jeweler.

After spending nearly 30 years in prison for a crime he did not commit, Ford was released in March of 2014.

A few months after his release, he was diagnosed with terminal lung cancer. He lost his battle in June of 2015.

At the time of his death, Ford was fighting the state for $330,000 in compensation.

The state of Louisiana denied Ford compensation because they claim Ford knew about a jewelry store robbery where the owner, Isadore Rozeman, was killed. They said even though he did not pull the trigger, he did nothing to stop it.

When Ford died, his attorney's told KSLA News 12 that they would continue to fight on behalf of him.

National columnist and author Joyce King has also joined in the fight for Ford's compensation, and has even written about Louisiana's compensation laws which she calls "ridiculous."

"I have urged officials to chunk it, throw it away, start over, write a completely different law," King told KSLA News 12 last year.

According to Louisiana's compensation laws, if approved, Glenn would receive $25,000 for every year of incarceration. That amount is capped at $250,000. Another $80,000 is for loss of life opportunities. That's a total of $330,000.

King was the first non-lawyer appointed to the Innocence Project of Texas. She was a part of the team in making Texas compensation better for exonerees.

King said, "I also would like for Louisianians or a lawmaker to contact us and consider the Glenn Ford Compensation Law. If we are going to rewrite the law let's do it for a man that got denied compensation and let him have a legacy instead of this awful ending."

Ford's case will go before the Second Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday at 1:30 p.m.

Ford's attorneys from the Innocence Project New Orleans will be arguing that the trial court got it wrong when they said he was not entitled to compensation.

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