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‘I get to do something I love to do’: SPD addresses officer shortage, recruitment efforts

As of October 25, 74 homicides have been recorded this year, which is just the second time in...
As of October 25, 74 homicides have been recorded this year, which is just the second time in city history that Shreveport has exceeded 70 killings. The record was set in 1993, with 76 homicides - the single deadliest year for the city.(KSLA)
Published: Oct. 25, 2021 at 8:53 AM CDT
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SHREVEPORT, La. (KSLA) - It is no secret that the Shreveport Police Department (SPD) is facing a substantial shortage of officers — as the city witnesses near-historic levels of violent crime.

As of October 25, 74 homicides have been recorded this year, which is just the second time in city history that Shreveport has exceeded 70 killings. The record was set in 1993, with 76 homicides - the single deadliest year for the city.

According to SPD, the department has the opportunity to hire 110 officers. The ripple effect created by this deficit is felt in nearly every department within SPD.

“Our officers, especially our detectives and our supplemental staff, are required to work supplemental patrol shifts,” said Cpl. Chris Bordelon, a 12-year veteran of SPD. “They work an additional patrol shift on top of whatever their [normal] shift is.”

Bordelon also noted that present patrol officers are working overtime to fill other gaps created by the shortage of personnel.

“Deep down, we are all patrol officers, that is the first job when we get here and graduate the academy,” said Bordelon. “For some of us, there is a period of time where we’re getting used to it [working patrol], I love getting back out in the community.”

As violent crime continues to remain a near-daily occurrence in Shreveport, Bordelon says now is the perfect time to become a police officer — with the mission of protecting and serving the community.

“I am looking for people who are expert communicators, people who are able to deescalate situations and use common sense to deal with everyday citizens,” he explained. “We go from place to place just solving problems for people.”

To become an officer, an individual must be a U.S. citizen, 21 years old, have a valid driver’s license, be able to pass a background check, have no felony convictions and pass the state civil service exam.

Regardless of the department’s current circumstances, Bordelon remains hopeful, grateful and optimistic about SPD’s future.

Every day I come to work, I get to do something I love to do. I get to serve my community and I get to interact with lots of people who want to help serve the community as a recruiter for the police department.

Cpl. Chris Bordelon | Shreveport Police Department

Tap or click here for more information about becoming a Shreveport police officer.

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