Advertisement

Death toll in La. from Hurricane Ida rises to 26, officials say

9 of 11 new deaths related to extended power outages
Published: Sep. 8, 2021 at 3:53 PM CDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

The following information is from the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH):

Baton Rouge, La. (Sept. 8, 2021) — Following a full review of cases since Hurricane Ida’s landfall and the conclusion of several investigations, the Orleans Parish Coroner’s Office has confirmed 11 additional storm-related deaths. This brings the death toll from Hurricane Ida to 26.

The 11 deaths occurred or were reported to the Coroner’s Office between August 30, 2021 and September 6, 2021.

The table below lists the current total of deaths classified by the relevant coroner as being related to Hurricane Ida. New information is shown in red.

Death toll in Louisiana from Hurricane Ida as of Sept. 8, 2021
Death toll in Louisiana from Hurricane Ida as of Sept. 8, 2021(Louisiana Department of Health)

In an effort to ensure the most accurate reporting of deaths that are attributable to Hurricane Ida, the Louisiana Department of Health will only report a death after it has been confirmed as storm-related by the parish coroner.

Heat-related illness

Those at greatest risk for heat-related illness include infants and children up to 4 years of age, people 65 years of age and older, people who are overweight, and people who are ill or on certain medications.

Heat stroke is the most serious heat-related illness, occurring when the body’s temperature rises rapidly, the sweating mechanism fails and the body is unable to cool down. Body temperature may rise to 106°F or higher within 10 to 15 minutes. Heat stroke can cause death or permanent disability if emergency treatment is not provided.

Warning signs of heat stroke vary but may include the following:

  • An extremely high body temperature (above 103°F)
  • Red, hot, and dry skin (no sweating)
  • Rapid, strong pulse
  • Throbbing headache
  • Dizziness
  • Nausea
  • Confusion
  • Unconsciousness

If you see any of these signs, have someone call for immediate medical assistance while you begin cooling the victim. Do the following:

  • Get the victim to a shady area.
  • Cool the victim rapidly, using whatever methods you can. For example, immerse the victim in a tub of cool water; place the person in a cool shower; spray the victim with cool water from a garden hose; sponge the person with cool water; or if the humidity is low, wrap the victim in a cool, wet sheet and fan him or her vigorously.
  • Monitor body temperature and continue cooling efforts until the body temperature drops to 101-102°F.
  • If emergency medical personnel are delayed, call the hospital emergency room for further instructions.
  • Do not give the victim alcohol to drink.
  • Get medical assistance as soon as possible.

Generator safety

Please use your portable or stand-by generator safely by following this advice from the Office of the State Fire Marshal:

  • Place generators at least 20 feet away from your home.
  • Look for any air entry points into the home near your unit and ensure that those are properly closed and sealed off, such as windows or doors, air intakes, nearby dryer vents or crawl spaces.
  • Have a CO alarm
  • Give these generators breaks that allow for any concentrated exhaust to clear away from the area.
  • Open your windows and doors during this break to air out any concentration that may have collected in your home.
  • Check the manufacturing specs to verify the installation meets those specs.
  • If there’s a concern that the installation standards were not met, get an appropriate party, like the installer, out to inspect it.
  • Ensure your generator is being appropriately maintained, including the oil change frequency requirements.

The most common symptoms of CO poisoning are headache, dizziness, weakness, upset stomach, vomiting, chest pain and confusion. CO symptoms are often described as “flu-like.” If you breathe in a lot of CO it can make you pass out or kill you. People who are sleeping or drunk can die from CO poisoning before they have symptoms.

Click here to report a typo.

Copyright 2021 WAFB. All rights reserved.