Advertisement

Advisory group reports concerns it found while investigating mistrust between Shreveport police, citizens

Among other things, the panel cites the number of fire, police employees on the 9-member civil service board
Shreveport Police Substitute Police Chief Ben Raymond looks on at a special meeting of the...
Shreveport Police Substitute Police Chief Ben Raymond looks on at a special meeting of the Shreveport Municipal Fire and Police Civil Service Board.
Updated: Feb. 9, 2021 at 11:33 PM CST
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

SHREVEPORT, La. (KSLA) — An advisory `group has identified a few possible reasons for mistrust between Shreveport citizens and the city’s police.

The Police and Community Relations Work Group reports that, over the past seven to eight months, it primarily has been examining the effectiveness of discipline the police chief has imposed within the Police Department.

The work group is part of the Commission on Race and Diversity that Mayor Adrian Perkins put to work in June. Among other things, he tasked commissioners with addressing the apparent lack of trust between members of the Black community and police.

Since its formation, the race commission has formed seven work groups with each one tasked with tackling a particular subject. Among them is the Police and Community Relations Work Group.

Working on the premise that any lack of accountability gives rise to mistrust, that work group is investigating whether police officers are held accountable for misconduct and, if so, how they are held accountable.

There are three ways:

  1. The police chief can discipline an officer,
  2. A prosecutor can file criminal charges against an officer who is suspected of misconduct, and,
  3. A victim of police misconduct can file a civil lawsuit against the officer(s).

This particular work group is exploring the effectiveness of all three of these. But it reports that it primarily has been examining the effectiveness of discipline the police chief has imposed within the Police Department.

City Council Meeting February 9, 2021

City Council Meeting February 9, 2021

Posted by Shreveport Mayor Adrian Perkins on Tuesday, February 9, 2021

And while the group’s members say they are not yet ready to make a final determination or recommendation to the race commission, they are concerned about the number of Fire Department and Police Department employees who serve on the nine-member Fire and Police Civil Service Board.

“We are concerned because of the appearance, at least, that regular police and fire employees have an outsized say in determining whether they are disciplined or not, an appearance that might reasonably give rise to mistrust,” the panel says in a report that commissioners presented Tuesday to City Council members.

The work group’s report says its members also are concerned:

  • that the fire and police personnel who serve on the civil service board are elected by regular employees of their departments as opposed to being elected by citizens or appointed by someone, such as the mayor, who is elected, and,
  • by the number of civil service board members that it takes to constitute a quorum in Shreveport as compared to other municipalities.

Below is the full report that the Commission on Race and Diversity presented to City Council members on Tuesday, Feb. 9. It includes further details about the Police and Community Relations Work Group’s findings:

Copyright 2021 KSLA. All rights reserved.