D.C. riot did little to deter votes to overturn election results

D.C. riot did little to deter votes to overturn election results
When Congress reconvened Wednesday night to finish certifying the November election, there had been hopes that after the rioting and ransacking of the nation’s capitol that objections to electoral college votes would greatly diminish. (Source: KSLA)

SHREVEPORT, La. (KSLA) - When Congress reconvened Wednesday night to finish certifying the November election, there had been hopes that after the rioting and ransacking of the nation’s capitol that objections to electoral college votes would greatly diminish.

However, the violence did little to convince most of Louisiana’s congressional delegation to change their stance.

Among the delegation only two of the 8 members did not vote to overturn election results, including Senator Bill Cassidy.

During an interview the next day, Senator Cassidy did not mention anyone by name, but said those who have repeated claims of voter fraud without evidence only help fuel the anger of Trump supporters that finally ignited this week.

“We have to recognize that people that continue to promote things that were false that have been proven to be false in 60, by 60 different court cases that was wrong,” said Cassidy.

Louisiana Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell is now speaking out against those in the state’s delegation who voted to oppose those results.

“Not standing up, and say, ‘hey look, we had an election, 60 judges have ruled and said it was valid. The supreme court said it was valid. And to go on with that stuff and make that up about how the election’s been stolen, that’s dangerous,” said Campbell.

Reached by phone, Campbell explained the dangers of fomenting public rage as the president has continued to do since the election.

“You spew hate and you hate, hate, hate, hate and all the propaganda, which wasn’t true, and everybody just put up with it and put up with it, he’s lied and lied and lied and he spews hate it finally boils over. And that’s what happened yesterday,” said Campbell.

There has not been a scene like Wednesday’s sacking of the capitol since August of 1814; and back then it was British soldiers during the War of 1812.

Elected officials like U.S. Representative Bruce Westerman from the 4th Congressional District in southwest Arkansas say it’s heartbreaking to see Americans behave this way.

“It’s a sad day. This was the first time since then, but these people are law breakers, they’re rioters. The need to be arrested and charged to the full extent of the law for what they did,” said Westerman.

Copyright 2021 KSLA. All rights reserved.