Community responds to COVID-19 fatigue, information overload 10 months into pandemic

Community responds to COVID-19 fatigue, information overload 10 months into pandemic
The seemingly never-ending news cycle of the COVID-19 pandemic, and all the efforts to fight it, can get a bit overwhelming. (Source: KSLA)

SHREVEPORT, La. (KSLA) - The seemingly never-ending news cycle of the COVID-19 pandemic, and all the efforts to fight it, can get a bit overwhelming.

That’s especially true when you consider we have been confronted by this deadly virus for the last 10 months, starting back in March 2020.

One example came on Wednesday morning, Dec. 30, when several big developments were all unfolding.

California now also reporting 2nd strain of COVID-19

News the U.K. have now okayed emergency use of the AstraZeneca vaccine, potentially foreshadows the same here in the U.S.

There had been reports the global biopharmaceutical giant would seek emergency approval from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as early as February. However, according to a Trump Administration health official, that timing could be delayed until April to allow for more testing.

There’s also a new COVID strain in the U.K. that could be up to 70 percent more infectious. The first case has turned up in the U.S. with a man in his 20′s living in Colorado, with no recent traveling to speak of.

Then there’s growing frustration about the speed of vaccine deployment nationally. The federal government has now moved 11 million doses yet only 2 million shots have been given out so far.

Dr. Joseph Bocchini, an infectious disease specialist with Willis Knighton, says of all the headlines right now, that vaccine rollout delay causes him the most worry.

“We have to improve our ability to get the vaccine in people’s arms as quickly as it becomes available,” says Bocchini.

Meanwhile, vaccines have arrived this week for frontline staff and residents at The Oaks of Louisiana, an assisted living facility in south Shreveport.

Nursing supervisor Jessica Bryant described her feelings of having the vaccines arrive at The Oaks.

“I feel blessed to be able to be part of this revolution, so to speak, because, you know, there were people that had to be the first ones to take the smallpox vaccine and the polio vaccine. And we’re just, this is our era,” said Bryant.

However, not everyone has decided whether or not to get their vaccination just yet. Just ask Donald Johnson, a Baton Rouge father and teacher who brought his son, an LSU-Shreveport student and basketball player, to a weekly COVID-19 testing clinic at Querbes Community Center.

“Right now, I’m about 50-50. I guess I want to see how things go,” said Johnson.

Copyright 2020 KSLA. All rights reserved.