Should we get rid of Daylight Saving Time?

Should we get rid of Daylight Saving Time?
For evening commuters, suddenly it will be almost dark at 5:30 p.m. on the way home next week. (Source: Pexels)

BATON ROUGE, La. (WAFB) - On Sunday morning, when we wake up after setting clocks back to mark the end of Daylight Saving Time (DST), many may notice that the sun “rises” earlier and “sets” earlier, too, by clock time.

For morning joggers and school kids headed to the bus stop, this is an earlier-morning-sun benefit. But for evening commuters, suddenly it will be almost dark at 5:30 p.m. on the way home next week.

The Adoption of DST, not just in the United States but globally, was driven by a number of reasons. The two primary motivations were (1) to extend the period of evening sunlight and (2) to save energy. While the first reason still holds true today, numerous studies show that the second reason no longer applies in modern societies.

In fact, an Indiana study suggested that DST actually increased overall costs for that state.

The whole concept of DST is under more and more debate these days. Discussions range from “discontinuing it all together” all the way to “implementing it year-round.”

In the past few decades, the U.S. has extended the duration of DST (see table), yet Hawaii and most of Arizona do not invoke the annual time-shift.

Daylight Saving Time chart
Daylight Saving Time chart (Source: .)

And this past spring, the Florida State Senate adopted a resolution to make DST “always on” across the Sunshine State (this state law requires federal approval).

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