Jeff Castle: The worst of storm season isn’t behind us - just yet

Jeff Castle: The worst of storm season isn’t behind us - just yet
It's already been a very active storm season this spring with damage striking in many different parts of the Ark-La-Tex. The question now: Is the worst of that stormy weather behind us - or not? (Source: Bubba Kneipp)

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) - Maud, Texas is just the latest community impacted by bad weather lately. In fact, it’s already been a very active storm season this spring with damage striking in many different parts of the Ark-La-Tex.

The question now: Is the worst of that stormy weather behind us or not?

Storm cleanup was in full swing in Maud, Texas west of Texarkana on this Friday. It's become a common sight this spring in our area, as people come together to help friends, neighbors, relatives and perfect strangers.

Just last weekend storms hit the Blanchard area - leaving yet another trail of destruction yet again and it's not over yet.

The season actually started early with an outbreak of 3 tornadoes in northwest Louisiana on March 9th, hitting parts of Caddo, Bossier and Webster Parishes.

According to KSLA Chief Meteorologist Jeff Castle, typically majority of twisters hit in April.

"On average we get about 10 across the entire four state area. And we're likely just a little bit below that on the official numbers."

And Jeff tells us May isn't far behind in tornadoes every year. That's why he says the worst of the storm season is not behind us just yet.

"We might get a little break here for the next few weeks. But quite often as we head toward the end of May we can sometimes get an uptick in severe weather and tornado activity."

Fortunately, so far the largest tornadoes to hit in our viewing area have been EF-2s with maximum sustained winds between 111 to 135 miles an hour.

By comparison, the largest tornadoes are rated as EF-5, on what's called the Enhanced Fujita Scale, with maximum sustained winds above 200 miles per hour.

"A lot of what we've seen has been damage from straight-line wind. We've not had what I would consider and what most people would consider any sort of significant tornadoes."

Jeff cautions against letting our guard down and not stay vigilant about being ‘weather aware.’

Fortunately, there are no reports of any critical injuries or deaths during this storm surge in our viewing area.

Emergency officials urge the public to have working flashlights on hand, along with batteries and a weather radio.

They also suggest that this time of year you should always try to keep your cell phone fully charged and your vehicle full of gas, just in case.

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