Taking Back Our Streets: A pastor's stern words about fighting c - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Taking Back Our Streets: A pastor's stern words about fighting crime in Shreveport

“Ain't nobody seen nothing, don't nobody know nothing until it's your family member dead. Now you want everybody to tell what's going on,” says Dr. R. Timothy Jones, pastor of Peaceful Rest Baptist in Shreveport. (Source: KSLA News 12) “Ain't nobody seen nothing, don't nobody know nothing until it's your family member dead. Now you want everybody to tell what's going on,” says Dr. R. Timothy Jones, pastor of Peaceful Rest Baptist in Shreveport. (Source: KSLA News 12)

Dr. R. Timothy Jones says he is sick of all of the violence.

The pastor of Peaceful Rest Baptist Church in Shreveport can be seen on video addressing the subject in what he calls a candid conversation with his congregation.

A conversation that has since gone viral on social media. 

In the message, Jones calls out the community from the grandmother who won’t speak up to the media he says only focus on bad news.

In this weekly Taking Back Our Streets segment, Jones explains to KSLA News 12 anchor Domonique Benn why everyone - not just the church - should be held accountable.

“Folk are quick to talk about what the church ain't doing.  We can't save a child you won't bring to church,” he fires from the pulpit.

He also calls out those who sit in silence when they have answers.

“Ain't nobody seen nothing, don't nobody know nothing until it's your family member dead. Now you want everybody to tell what's going on.” 

Jones is one of 13 children who grew up in Cedar Grove, one of Shreveport’s toughest neighborhoods. It's an area that has seen its share of violence.

The pastor says that he still loves the area and that there are great people who still live there. 

He faults the media for highlighting the bad in the Cedar Grove area. 

In fact, Jones says, it’s only 6 percent the population who cause problems. 

He quotes research from the U.S. Library of Medicine.  “So you have 94 percent of everybody doing what they are supposed to do.

"But what sells newspapers and what gets ratings for media outlets is what's bleeding, it's what's critical, the most dire things," the pastor says.

"Nobody's going to go on the news and say this child passed his test. But it does so much for newspapers when it says this child got shot.”

The media can do a better job of highlighting more of the positive coming out of Cedar Grove, Jones says. “I think all of the media outlets can do a much better job of portraying the community in a better light or positive things that go on in the community."

What is covered can have economic consequences, he says.

"If I am a prospective corporation looking to relocate, of course I am going to check out the news outlets. But if most of what is there is all negative and few things are positive, I think that is going to hurt my perspective of a community and may impact my decision to come or not come."

But while Cedar Grove has its challenges, Jones believes it can be resurrected. 

That's one reason he decided to build his church in Cedar Grove, so it could be involved. 

Now Peaceful Rest Baptist has a community development organization, a preschool and a learning center.

The congregation also is involved in the community through events like ministry in the park. 

“My heart is really broken by what we are seeing," Jones says.

"But I think there is apathy in this town. It's across the board. I mean socially, economically, spiritually.

"And when you are in that kind of environment, we should be thanking God that it isn't any worse than it is.”  

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