Gun sales rise in Bossier City in wake of Las Vegas massacre - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Gun sales rise in Bossier City in wake of Las Vegas massacre

Gene Mock, of Ron's Guns, demonstrates a Daniel Defense bump fire stock. (Source: KSLA News 12) Gene Mock, of Ron's Guns, demonstrates a Daniel Defense bump fire stock. (Source: KSLA News 12)
Renewed emphasis on gun control legislation has gun companies' stock prices on the rise. "I think the logic behind why we saw this bump up was that it was a lot of change in Washington, a lot of change that's going on right now," Brendan Beck said. (KSLA) Renewed emphasis on gun control legislation has gun companies' stock prices on the rise. "I think the logic behind why we saw this bump up was that it was a lot of change in Washington, a lot of change that's going on right now," Brendan Beck said. (KSLA)
BOSSIER CITY, LA (KSLA) -

Debate over gun control is picking up steam in the wake of a gunman killing dozens of people and wounding hundreds more on the Las Vegas Strip.

The renewed emphasis has gun sales in Bossier City and gun companies' stock prices on the rise.

"I think the logic behind why we saw this bump up was that it was a lot of change in Washington, a lot of change that's going on right now," said Brendan Beck, a financial analyst with Evans Financial. 

"And I think we're kind of defensive."

The possibility of new gun legislation is compelling people to buy, said Gene Mock, who runs Ron's Guns with his father, Ron.

"I had an 82-year-old woman come in. I showed her. She said 'I want two of 'em'," Gene Mock said.

"I was like 'What are you going to do with them?'

She was like 'I'm not going to do nothing with them. But the government doesn't want me to have it, so I'm going to get 2 of them'."

Mock said he also has seen a bump in the sale of bump fire stocks, the devices that enabled the Las Vegas shooter to fire his guns at a faster pace.

"This is Daniel Defense. This is one that you saw on the pictures on the news," Mock said, displaying the gear.

"And this is the bump fire stock. It just floats back and forth. And when you press your finger against the stock as you push forward … when you push forward, it fires the weapon and the gun just ..."

Democratic senators proposed Wednesday proposed a ban on bump stocks.

The proposal to ban the rifle attachments is aimed at stopping rapid firing. 

The bill is being offered by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, the Senate Judiciary Committee’s top-ranking Democrat.

Paul Murray, who owns Shooters USA, reminds gun owners to take safety seriously.

"I had a guy this morning call and say he got his concealed carry online, and that kind of stuff scares me," Murray said.

"There's a lot of value in getting gun lessons from certified gun instructors and learning about the rules, the laws how to carry, when to carry, what not to carry, that kind of thing."

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