Bossier City mother fears for her son's future if DACA is rescin - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Bossier City mother fears for her son's future if DACA is rescinded

Maria Reveles and her son, Jesus Santos, speaks to KSLA about her fears for her oldest son working in Texas if DACA is rescinded. (Source: Nick Lawton, KSLA) Maria Reveles and her son, Jesus Santos, speaks to KSLA about her fears for her oldest son working in Texas if DACA is rescinded. (Source: Nick Lawton, KSLA)
Marcos Santos is married with two children working as a pharmacy technician in Fort Worth, Texas thanks to DACA. (Source: Santos Family) Marcos Santos is married with two children working as a pharmacy technician in Fort Worth, Texas thanks to DACA. (Source: Santos Family)
BOSSIER CITY, LA (KSLA) -

A Bossier City mother is asking President Donald Trump and Congress to act with heart and care in determining the future of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program (DACA).

Amidst the controversy and headlines surrounding DACA, Maria Reveles' thoughts are always of her son, 26-year-old Marcos Santos.

Reveles said she brought her son to the United States from Mexico back in 1992 when he was 16 months old. She was looking for work.

Today, Santos works as a pharmacy technician in Fort Worth, Texas and has two children. He met his wife in high school in Texas. She was an American citizen and though they've already been married in a courthouse, they are planning a family ceremony after he finishes his studies to become an EMT.

But now all of that could be at risk after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced this week that DACA was being rescinded.

Reveles said she can barely talk to her distraught son over the phone now.

"He say 'Mom, I could lose everything. I work so hard for stay right now where I am staying and one moment....everything..." Reveles trailed off.

DACA, an Obama-era program, allows undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children to get driver's licenses, enroll in college, secure jobs and pay income taxes, provided they arrived in the U.S. before the age of 16 and have been living there since June 15, 2007.

Since the Obama Administration implemented DACA back in 2012, more than 780,000 people have been approved for the program.

If DACA is rescinded with no alternative program in place, all of those people face possible deportation in 2018.

The Trump Administration calls DACA unconstitutional, saying it plans to phase the program out in a way that will only cause "minimum disruption."

Administration officials said they won't accept any new applications to the program but they will honor any work permits issued under DACA until they expire.

They also report anyone whose DACA status is expiring in March 2018 has one month to obtain a new two-year permit.

The Trump Administration has called for more protections against undocumented criminals.

Santos' younger brother Jesus, who was born in Texas, asks why his brother, a pharmacy technician, is being lumped in with criminals.

"When he got that DACA opportunity, he was able to get the job. He was able to actually go throw out all these applications," Jesus Santos said. "That was his opportunity and now he feels like they're just taking it away from him."

Reveles says Santos has been trying to obtain his green card but they worry he won't be able to get it in time. It took her 21 years to obtain hers.

President Trump has now called on Congress to find a compromise, a way to legalize DACA, within 6 months.

"I hope so," says Reveles. "We have a last chance and then everything . "We have a last chance and then everything changes."

"The American Dream: Keep building for your family. We can't do that if half of our family is on the other side," Jesus stressed.

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