Obama's name still on welcome letters to new citizens - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Obama's name still on welcome letters to new citizens

Barack Obama, shown here, is no longer president despite what welcomes letters to naturalized citizens may say. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim) Barack Obama, shown here, is no longer president despite what welcomes letters to naturalized citizens may say. (AP Photo/Achmad Ibrahim)

(RNN) - New U.S. citizens are still being welcomed by former President Barack Obama.

Letters of welcome and congratulations on becoming a newly naturalized citizen still carry Obama's signature and not that of President Donald Trump.

According to a spokeswoman for Citizenship and Immigration quoted by The Arizona Republic, it's not uncommon for a new president to take a few months to get their own paperwork finalized, but generally during that time no letters are sent rather than one bearing the predecessor's name.

Trump has been president for three days shy of six months and has yet to nominate candidates for hundreds of government positions.

Trump's anti-immigration statements have led to an increase in citizenship applications, according to an analysis by the Pew Research Center.

But for some, the lingering Obama signatures aren't a problem and are preferable to a Trump-signed document.

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