Man convicted of killing Shreveporter, faces up to 40 years - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Man convicted of killing Shreveporter, faces up to 40 years

Kevin Ray Bowers, 30 (Source: Caddo District Attorney General) Kevin Ray Bowers, 30 (Source: Caddo District Attorney General)
SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

A Caddo Parish jury found a Shreveport man guilty of manslaughter in the August 2014 slaying of Dejuan Kennedy. 

Kevin Ray Bowers, 30 is accused of shooting 22-year-old Kennedy in the upper body with a semi-automatic rifle in the 4100 block of Jacob Street. Police say Bowers and Kennedy knew each other.

Bowers was originally charged with second-degree murder and faced a sentence of life in prison.

After a two hour deliberation Friday, a Caddo Parish jury says Bowers will be sentenced up to 40 years for manslaughter.

Bowers has previous convictions for second-degree battery in 2003, domestic abuse battery in 2008, attempted possession of a firearm by a felon in 2005 and possession of marijuana with the intent to distribute in 2011. 

His next court date will be May 25 for post-trial motions. 

Copyright 2016. KSLA. All rights reserved. 

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