Mardi Gras landed on the map in Louisiana in 1699 - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Mardi Gras landed on the map in Louisiana in 1699

Source:The Historic New Orleans Collection Source:The Historic New Orleans Collection
Les Costes Aux Environs De La Riviere de Misisipi Decouvertes par Mr. de la Salle n 1683 et reconnues par Mr. le Chevallier d’Iberville en 1698   (Source: The Historic New Orleans Collection, Bequest of Richard Koch) Les Costes Aux Environs De La Riviere de Misisipi Decouvertes par Mr. de la Salle n 1683 et reconnues par Mr. le Chevallier d’Iberville en 1698 (Source: The Historic New Orleans Collection, Bequest of Richard Koch)
Pierre Le Moyne, sieur d'Iberville  (Source: The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mr. Thomas N. Lennox) Pierre Le Moyne, sieur d'Iberville (Source: The Historic New Orleans Collection, Gift of Mr. Thomas N. Lennox)
NEW ORLEANS, LA (WVUE) -

It wasn't New Orleans or even Mobile that first put Mardi Gras on the map in North America. 

Mardi Gras arrived on March 3, 1699, along with French explorer Pierre Le Moyne d'Iberville.   

France commissioned the 38-year-old French Canadian to find and explore the Mississippi river from its Gulf outlet. Iberville and his men rowed two longboats up the river and landed on a spot just across the river from what is now Fort Jackson. 

Since it was Fat Tuesday, Iberville named the spot Pointe du Mardi Gras and called a nearby body of water Bayou Mardi Gras. The name fell out of usage over time, but in 1971, Plaquemines Parish officials reclaimed the spot's history and erected a commemorative marker at Fort Jackson. 

When the 300th anniversary of Iberville's camp out rolled around in 1999, members of the Krewe of Rex took a boat trip to Iberville's original landing spot. Rex also erected a second commemorative plaque at Fort Jackson. 

You can check out this piece of Mardi Gras history for yourself on Highway 23 near Buras. 

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