Red River breaks through sandbag wall at Les Maison - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Red River breaks through sandbag wall at Les Maison

Bucky Crouch wades through chest deep water to get to his house. Bucky Crouch wades through chest deep water to get to his house.
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SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

Neighbors in the Les Maison subdivision are going deeper into week two without power, without water and fighting to keep the Red River out of their homes. The nightmare came true for one house Tuesday night when water broke through the sandbag wall.

"We have about 12 pumps going at all times," said Bucky Crouch as he wades through chest deep water and pointed out where the wall breached.

Water came under the wall where a pump is now located. They were able to stabilize the wall, but not until after water got into their home. 

"I'd say at least a foot in the house without the wall," said Crouch.

Fortunately, only the carpet was affected. Crouch says that's thanks to quick action.

"We were able to slow it down where the pumps could at least maintain," he said. "Then today with the sunlight we were able to find the problem."

To get into the room that was affected, we had to climb over a nearly six foot wall. On the other side, it almost feels like you've entered a war zone. Sandbags are backed by support beams, the constant roar of pumps and generators, and your enemy is the "Raging Red" that is pushing against the fortress with crushing pressure. It's very stressful for the young homeowner.

"It weighs on you to where you're not as hungry as you are and you're not sleeping as much. It takes you hours, when we do get back to our other house, we may only have 4 or 5 hours to rest and it takes 1 or 2 to stop thinking about it," he said.

Crouch says he's staying strong through the friendly faces who keep coming back to help. 

"If you've seen it once, why would you come back if you didn't live here. So they must really love us a lot."

Crouch says support from the community has been overwhelming and he appreciates the food and water that keeps coming. He says what they need most, for now, is gasoline to power their pumps that are running 24 hours a day.

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