Officials ready for input on disposal of M6 propellant at Camp M - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Officials ready for input on disposal of M6 propellant at Camp Minden

The cost of getting rid of millions of pounds of M6 propellant left on the grounds of Camp Minden two years ago is expected to add up to millions of dollars. The cost of getting rid of millions of pounds of M6 propellant left on the grounds of Camp Minden two years ago is expected to add up to millions of dollars.
Millions of pounds of M6 was ultimately determined to be improperly stored, which resulted in a criminal investigation and several arrests. Millions of pounds of M6 was ultimately determined to be improperly stored, which resulted in a criminal investigation and several arrests.
The material was found during an inspection by a Louisiana State Police investigator following up on the October 15, 2012 explosion inside a bunker on property at Camp Minden leased by Explo. The material was found during an inspection by a Louisiana State Police investigator following up on the October 15, 2012 explosion inside a bunker on property at Camp Minden leased by Explo.
CAMP MINDEN, LA (KSLA) -

The cost of getting rid of millions of pounds of M6 propellant left on the grounds of Camp Minden two years ago is expected to add up to millions of dollars.

It's already decided that the potentially dangerous material will be burned. The question is whether that will be done in an open pit or in an incinerator.

Now that the U.S. Army has signed off on an agreement to pay for the disposal, the EPA has 10 days to open a 30-day public comment period allowing for public input on what they think of those options.

The material was found during an inspection by a Louisiana State Police investigator following up on the October 15, 2012 explosion inside a bunker on property leased by Explo, and determined to be improperly stored, which resulted in a criminal investigation and several arrests.

On Thursday, state leaders and Environmental Protection Agency officials announced that the U.S. Army agreed to pay for the multi-million dollar plan.

The EPA says they're hearing a lot of concerns from people living nearby, including Doyline, about an open burning.

Officials say they have looked into the process of using an incinerator as a cleaner method. The EPA says they will evaluate all of the cleanup options thoroughly and allow opportunities for the public to comment before making a decision.

"We want to make sure everyone knows how the process is going to take and what is happening as it develops. We want to make sure we're open and honest, and forthright with everything," said State Representative Jeff Thompson from Bossier City, Louisiana.

Toward that end, Rep. Thompson says the Webster parish Sheriff's Office is expected to hold a series of town hall meetings. The dates and locations of those meetings have not yet been finalized.

The cleanup process is expected to get started sometime at the beginning of next year.

The entire process will be overseen by the Environmental Protection Agency, and the Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality.

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