Local astronomer thinks big 'boom' heard in ArkLaTex could have - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Local astronomer thinks big 'boom' heard in ArkLaTex could have been meteor

With the help of Tubreaux Aviation, KSLA News 12's Clay Ostarly took a flight over the area to looking for any signs of disturbances or anything out of the ordinary that might lead to a source of Monday's boom. With the help of Tubreaux Aviation, KSLA News 12's Clay Ostarly took a flight over the area to looking for any signs of disturbances or anything out of the ordinary that might lead to a source of Monday's boom.
NWS Senior Forecaster Marty Mayeaux says the radar showed debris was indicated rising 1,000 to 1,500 feet into the air, and that it drifted eastward toward Bienville Parish. (Source: Marty Mayeaux, NWS Shreveport) NWS Senior Forecaster Marty Mayeaux says the radar showed debris was indicated rising 1,000 to 1,500 feet into the air, and that it drifted eastward toward Bienville Parish. (Source: Marty Mayeaux, NWS Shreveport)
SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

There is still no confirmed explanation for what caused "boom" heard around the ArkLaTex on Monday afternoon, but there are some clues and plenty of theories, including what one local astronomer described as a meteor entering the atmosphere.

While nothing has been identified for sure, Greg Andrews with the Shreveport-Bossier Astronomical Society feels confident about one thing: "I'm sure there's going to be someone out there who says aliens are responsible, but I'm going to rule that one out unless other evidence points to that."

Andrews says something else could be to blame.

"The best answer is that it must have to be some type of meteor that for some odd reason we didn't see, and it exploded in our atmosphere," he said.

Some of those clues have led to a general area of interest in the search for answers, and KSLA News 12 took a look in that area from the air on Thursday.

With the help of Tubreaux Aviation, KSLA News 12's Clay Ostarly took a flight over the area to look for any signs of disturbances or anything out of the ordinary that might lead to a source.

At 1,500 feet in the air, Ostarly says he didn't see any signs of disturbances in the trees or signs of impact.

The reverberation was heard and felt by staffers at KSLA News 12 at the studios on Fairfield Ave. in Shreveport's Highland neighborhood at 4:27 p.m. The concussion rattled windows.

Meteorologist Jeff Castle says the closest incidence of possible thunder at that time was in Monroe, to the east in Ouachita Parish.

Some reports say it shook the ground, but the USGS says there was no seismic activity recorded in the area that day.

KSLA News 12 checked in with numerous law enforcement agencies and across the area and found no incidents that could have caused the noise and what some have also described as a shock wave.

On Tuesday, the National Weather Service revealed that they had picked up a debris field on radar Monday afternoon at the same the loud boom was heard. By Wednesday, a local man with experience in GIS mapping had come up with a digital map overlay estimating the possible area of impact based on the location of the plume, wind direction and other factors. The area, in the extreme northern tip of DeSoto Parish just south of Wallace Lake, was also where a lot of witness reports of the sound and vibration came from that afternoon.

The mystery continues, but KSLA News 12 will keep investigating until an exact cause has been determined.

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