Ex-prosecutor Perricone blames drug in posting scandal - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Ex-prosecutor Perricone blames drug in posting scandal

KEVIN McGILL

Associated Press

NEW ORLEANS (AP) - A former federal prosecutor says he was taking sleep medication when he made anonymous online comments that later prompted a judge to overturn convictions in a major New Orleans police scandal.

In a federal court filing in Baton Rouge, Sal Perricone acknowledges making online comments that led to his 2012 resignation - and the eventual order of a new trial for police charged in deadly shootings after Hurricane Katrina.

But, Perricone says he was using the prescription drug Ambien at the time and doesn't remember many of the comments. He apologized and vowed never to repeat such conduct, although, he says, it was constitutionally protected.

Perricone hopes to preserve his right to practice law in the Baton Rouge-based federal court. He can no longer practice in the New Orleans district.

(Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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