Blanchard mobile home fire kills 4 dogs - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Blanchard mobile home fire kills 4 dogs

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Four of seven dogs died in a mobile home fire in Blanchard Friday morning. Four of seven dogs died in a mobile home fire in Blanchard Friday morning.
Fire investigators are working to determine what caused the fire. Fire investigators are working to determine what caused the fire.
BLANCHARD, LA (KSLA) - Caddo Fire District 1 firefighters were able to rescue three of seven dogs, all Rottweilers, that were inside a mobile home when it caught fire Friday.The fire happened just before 9:30 a.m. in the 6800 block of North Colony Drive in Blanchard. Firefighters were able to get the fire under control in 10 minutes. Fire investigators determined the fire started in the kitchen area.

Four of the dogs in the mobile home died from their injuries. The home owner was not home at the time of the fire. The fire remains under investigation.

Neighbors on the scene, and a relative of the dog owner says they're all show dogs, and one was even a seven-time national champion. It's not clear if the champion is one of the four that died. 

"Actually the paramedics went to work on them and got them back up and got them moving around. And we had one of the guys transport them to a veterinarian," Fire District 1 Chief Dan Cotton said.

All three of the dogs transported are expected to survive.  One of those three surviving dogs was first rushed to a local vet clinic and then to University Veterinary Hospital in Shreveport, suffering from smoke inhalation and carbon monoxide poisoning.  

"It's the heat injury.  It's the toxins.  But it's also carbon monoxide," Veterinarian Jarod Williams explained.

Dr. Williams showed KSLA News 12 an x-ray of the 14-week old Rottweiler puppy named 'Purple Girl.'  

"She was breathing a little bit heavy.  She was lethargic," he added.

Dr. Williams says in such fires where dogs are rescued from the flames, carbon monoxide poisoning can be deceptively hard to spot.  

"They'll come in, and they'll look pink (gums), which fools you because you think that they're oxygenating well," he said. "But that's actually carbon monoxide."

He said that forces the red blood cell to be unable to release oxygen.  

"Usually treat it with time and oxygen," Williams explained. 

And 'Purple Girl' got plenty of both before being released back to her owner and taken home.

Williams credited at least part of 'Purple Girl's survival to the quick work of firefighters at the scene, and the first vet clinic to treat the puppy before it arrived at University Veterinary Hospital.

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