Officials: Air, water near Shreveport landfill safe - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Officials: Air, water near Shreveport landfill safe

Officials: Air, water near Shreveport landfill safe

State Sen. Greg Tarver speaks to Shreveport residents about the Harrelson landfill. State Sen. Greg Tarver speaks to Shreveport residents about the Harrelson landfill.
Firefighters worked to control a perpetual fire earlier this year at the Harrelson landfill. Firefighters worked to control a perpetual fire earlier this year at the Harrelson landfill.
SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

State environment officials said tests reveal that air and water near a Shreveport landfill are safe.

Results from air quality testing done near the Harrelson landfill came back recently. The state Department of Environmental Quality said the condition of that air is what would be expected in an urban area.

The results were shared Thursday afternoon at a meeting hosted by state Sen. Greg Tarver, D-Shreveport, at Southern University. Residents near the landfill, owned by Harrelson Materials Management Inc., said thick smoke and flames spewing from a perpetual blaze at the site has affected their quality of life.

The partially underground fire recently flared up again. Residents living near the landfill located off Russell Rd. just off I-220, have complained about the impact of the fires on the environment and their health.

In addition to the impact on air quality, concerns were floated that landfill runoff may have seeped into Cross Lake or 12 Mile Bayou. Jake Causey, chief engineer with the state Department of Health and Human Services, said there has been no runoff and there is no concern for it happening in the future.

On July 8, officials said the landfill had 8 months to put out the fire and then close. The DEQ said Thursday that it has the company's closure plan and will review it next week.

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