Police: Juvenile shot, injured on Galaxy Way - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Police: Juvenile shot, injured on Galaxy Way

Police said the shots fired call evolved into a shooting into an occupied dwelling, and finally an assault. Police said the shots fired call evolved into a shooting into an occupied dwelling, and finally an assault.
HUNTSVILLE, AL (WAFF) -

An early-morning shooting sent a child to the hospital and left police with unanswered questions.

It happened at the Twichenham Village Apartments on the 5000 block of Galaxy Way shortly after midnight Sunday morning.

Police said when they arrived at the scene, they found a child had been shot inside an apartment, and was being transported to Huntsville Hospital for treatment of a non-life-threatening injury.

Residents nearby said they heard over a dozen shots and said the child had been struck in the leg. There were conflicting reports as to whether the child was a girl or a boy.

Neighbor John Whisante said he has a newborn to think of, and Sunday morning's shooting has left him shocked and shaken.

"She is about 10 days old now," Whisante said. "It's scary for me. I am concerned about whether or not my family is safe."

Shailishia McCarver lives steps away from the apartment that was hit by gunfire.

"It definitely makes me think about changing locations, and I am," McCarver said.

Another neighbor said the people involved in the shooting were outsiders and did not live at the complex.

"This is something that has to be stopped," said McCarver's mother. "People should be able to come home and be safe in their own home."

Officers continue to investigate this case. No arrests have been made.

Copyright 2014 WAFF. All rights reserved.

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