Amber Alert cancelled for MI baby - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

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Amber Alert cancelled for MI baby

Nevaeh Cantrell-Jones Nevaeh Cantrell-Jones
Highland Park, Michigan -

UPDATE: Michigan Police have CANCELLED the Amber Alert as of 9:30 a.m. No further details have been released at this time. 

 

An Amber Alert has been issued for a missing 6-month-old girl in Michigan.

Police say Nevaeh Cantrell-Jones was last seen Sunday at 3 a.m. in the Highland Park area, near Detroit.

Investigators believe her father, Brandon Cantrell, 19, along with his brother, Maurice Brown, forced their way into the apartment of Navaeh's mother, pistol-whipping the women, then leaving with the toddler.

Police say both men were wearing black clothing and were armed with a dark hand gun. They took off in a dark colored, Saturn passenger vehicle. Officers say the men are armed and dangerous.

Nevaeh Cantrell-Jones is 6 months old, 2 feet. She has brown eyes and black hair. Nevaeh also has a birth mark on her right eye.

Nevaeh was last seen wearing a pink bow in her hair and a multi-colored striped onesie with white socks.

Navaeh's father, Brandon Cantrell, is described as a black male, 19 years of age, 5 feet 3 inches, 140 pounds, with brown eyes and black hair.

The second suspect, Maurice Devontae Brown, is a black male, 20 years of age, about 5 feet 10 inches tall, weighing 185 pounds. He has brown eyes and black hair.

If you have any information on the victim, abductor or vehicle, IMMEDIATELY call 911 or Highland Park Police Department at 313-852-7338.

For more information, visit http://www.amberalertmichigan.org/.

 

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