EPA orders Army to dispose of Camp Minden explosives - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

EPA orders Army to dispose of Camp Minden explosives

Posted: Updated: Apr 02, 2014 10:30 PM
Authorities have said Explo improperly stored tons of a military propellant at Cap Minden, causing evacuation of the town of Doyline in October 2013. (Source: Louisiana State Police) Authorities have said Explo improperly stored tons of a military propellant at Cap Minden, causing evacuation of the town of Doyline in October 2013. (Source: Louisiana State Police)
Since the discovery of the M6 propellant, state leaders have been trying to figure out a safe and cost-efficient way to get rid of it. (Source: Louisiana State Police) Since the discovery of the M6 propellant, state leaders have been trying to figure out a safe and cost-efficient way to get rid of it. (Source: Louisiana State Police)
CAMP MINDEN, LA (KSLA) -

The Environmental Protection Agency said the Department of the Army does have the authority and should be involved in the effort to get rid of more than 15 million pounds of explosives stored at Camp Minden.

"This is a long-term safety concern that needs immediate attention, and this order is a right step towards a permanent solution," said Louisiana Sen. David Vitter, who revealed the update Tuesday in a statement.

"This step paves the way to getting significant Army assistance and ensuring that Louisiana taxpayers don't get left with the bill now that we have cooperation from the State, and the EPA," he said.

When military contractor Explo went belly up the company abandoned the explosives, leaving the state holding the price tag for clean up.

State and federal lawmakers said it's the Army's problem, and the EPA agrees.

The story began in 2012, when state authorities said the explosives were left in Minden, and were not properly stored. The discovery led to the evacuation of the Town of Doyline, a criminal investigation, several arrests and the bankruptcy of Explo.

The material has been properly secured, but not disposed of. That will cost about $20 to $30 million.

Copyright 2014 KSLA. All rights reserved.

Powered by WorldNow