Highland residents speak out against proposed funeral home - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Highland residents speak out against proposed funeral home

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -
The rezoning battle continues in Shreveport's Highland neighborhood. A pending proposal would turn the old Don's Seafood Restaurant into a funeral home, but the effort is meeting resistance from neighbors.

The funeral home director Rosalind Patterson-Nelson met with neighbors Monday night at the Broadmoor Branch of the Shreve Memorial Library.  The meeting lasted for two hours and tensions flared at times, while neighbors expressed their concerns to Patterson-Nelson. Neighbors said, the funeral home would be a poor fit for their neighborhood and would cause too many traffic headaches.  
     
Patterson-nelson told the crowd funerals would only take place at certain times of the day, to avoid congestion. But the neighbors who attended the meeting say they aren't budging, they don't want the old seafood restaurant to be rezoned for the funeral home.  "I think there were very vocal people there that spoke and said this is how we feel. I think the city needs to know how we feel, I think the MPC needs to know how we feel about things not fitting with the big plan of what the city is supposed to be doing," said Highland resident Penny Durham.

Patterson-Nelson explained to the crowd, she wants the funeral home in that spot because the high traffic area, would make her business very visible.  

The planning commission will be at 1 in the afternoon this Wednesday to decide whether to rezone the building for the funeral home.

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