Willis Knighton implements illuminating vein-finding technology - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Willis Knighton implements illuminating vein-finding technology

AccuVein’s vein illumination system is designed to help healthcare professionals locate veins for venipuncture. (Source: Willis Knighton Health System) AccuVein’s vein illumination system is designed to help healthcare professionals locate veins for venipuncture. (Source: Willis Knighton Health System)
SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

If you've ever felt like a pincushion while giving blood or having it taken, technology now being used at Willis Knighton would be a welcome relief.

Willis Knighton Health System on Friday announced they have implemented the AccuVein AV400 vein illumination system on the nursing units at all four of its hospitals.

The system is designed to help healthcare professionals locate veins for venipuncture. It uses a safe beam of light, projected onto a patient's arm, to reveal a map of the peripheral veins on the skin's surface. 

According to a statement released by Willis Knighton, venipuncture is the most common invasive medical procedure worldwide with an estimated 2.7 million procedures conducted every day in the United States alone. Studies reveal that up to one third of attempts to access a vein fail the first time, creating unnecessary patient discomfort as well as additional costs. Improving first-stick attempts is a major goal for healthcare providers around the world.

Even the most experienced healthcare professionals can have difficulty accessing veins safely and quickly the first time. While this will be available for use on adult and pediatric units throughout the hospital, the patient care staff will find it especially helpful with patients who are dehydrated, obese, have low body temperature, whose veins roll and those who have had frequent venipuncture during treatments.

"This is going to be good for the nursing staff but even better for our patients," said Georgia Stephens, MSN, RN, patient care coordinator for staff development at Willis-Knighton Medical Center. "It illuminates the arm so the veins are easy to see. The AccuVein System does not touch the patient. Its use will enhance the comfort and safety of the patient and increase nursing efficiency."

Vein illumination has been introduced throughout the world and is being used in hospital emergency departments, neonatal units, surgery and intensive care units, as well as in blood banks. The AccuVein system is available for use at Willis-Knighton on both adult and pediatric units.

Copyright 2013 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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