Local rivers rising to flood levels - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Local rivers rise to flood levels

(Toledo News Now) -

Here are the current river statistics, reflecting the potential for flooding due to heavy rainfall on Saturday:

Blanchard River – Findlay

As of 10:00pm

Current: 15.12'

Forecast: 15.3'

Flood Stage: 11'

Flood Potential: MAJOR

 

Maumee River - Grand Rapids

As of 4:45pm

Current: 12.55'

Forecast: 15.8'

Flood Stage: 15'

Flood Potential: Minor

 

Sandusky River - Tiffin

As of 10:45pm

Current: 10.05'

Forecast: 10.5'

Flood Stage: 9'

Flood Potential: Moderate

 

Tiffin River - Stryker

As of 10:00pm

Current: 11.45'

Forecast: 12.7'

Flood Stage: 11'

Flood Potential: Minor

 

Maumee River - Napoleon

As of 9:45pm

Current: 8.58'

Forecast: 12.4'

Flood Stage: 12'

Flood Potential: Minor

Stay with your certified most accurate weather team for more updates.


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