'Love Don’t Hurt:' A Story of Domestic Violence - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

'Love Don’t Hurt:' A Story of Domestic Violence

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

A Shreveport mother of four says her struggle with domestic violence has moved her to take a stand with others in an upcoming Domestic Violence Walk.

Regina Jackson, 35, says her physical scars are now gone, but the mental scars still remain from her own past with domestic violence.

"He was in his work boots, and he broke these three ribs when he kicked me," says Jackson as she describes some of her former injuries.

She says she was in a domestically violent relationship 11 years ago with an ex-husband.

"I called 9-1-1, and I said either you guys are going to come and get him, or I am going to kill him," says Jackson. She says her last fight with her then husband was in 2002. She was able to escape that violent relationship but her sister was not as lucky.

"And he came in a rage, and stabbed her 21 times," says Jackson.

In 2007, Raylee Jackson was convicted of 1st degree murder in the stabbing death of his girlfriend Tamara Harris, 20, in North Little Rock.

In memory of her sister, and her own past, Jackson says she is lacing up her tennis shoes and joining the "Sistas with Swag" social club.

The club is recruiting people to come out and support the "Love Don't Hurt" domestic violence awareness walk.

The walk will be held at Frisbee Park on Clyde Fant Parkway on October 26th.

Organizers says they hope this walk will bring awareness and give a voice to those who may not feel like they have one.

Copyright 2013 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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