Taking it back: How repossession works - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Taking it back: How repossession works

Deputy marshals access a home to repossess furniture. Deputy marshals access a home to repossess furniture.
SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

It's a common occurrence.  When times get tough, some of us fall behind on payments for things we've financed or rented.  Falling too far behind can result in deputy marshals knocking at your door.

Here's how it works: The business hires a lawyer who goes before a judge to get a court order.  That court order allows these deputy marshals to show up and take back whatever it is you fell behind on.

We went with Shreveport deputy marshals to a home at the 2600 block of Abbie St. to witness the repossession of a bed, mattress and several other items.

There was nobody home but that didn't mean marshals just left. "A lot of people think if they don't open the door then we just go away. That's not the case. When we show up we have to execute the order whether they are home or not. We don't have a choice," says deputy marshal Carl Richard.

The court order allows marshals to get inside any way possible, including breaking down the door or busting through windows.  With guns drawn and flashlights in hand, deputy marshals entered the home through an open door in the back of the house. 

"It's a court order for the Marshal's Office to seize the property that belongs to the rental company. With that order, it gives us permission to come to the house with the address provided and seize the property out of the house," says Richard.

Richard says while they try not to damage people's property and when his office gets involved it's a last resort for businesses.

"They'd rather you just give it to them. Once you give it to them, you don't owe them a dime. They wipe the note clean. You don't owe them anything and your debt is paid to them," he says.

The job isn't a pleasant one for Richard, he says having to take people's stuff because they might have fallen on hard times is often hard on him as well. "I don't like doing this. It's part of my job. I hate doing it during Christmas time. Between cars and houses and furniture, when the judge issues an order you have to do what the judge orders you to go do. It's part of the job." 

If you want to avoid having deputy marshals at your home be sure to keep up with your payments and if you encounter financial difficulties, Richard says, make arrangements with the business to settle your debt.  You can also contact the marshal's office or Click here.

Copyright 2013 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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