Ark-La-Tex tanning salon reacts to FDA proposed changes - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Ark-La-Tex tanning salon reacts to FDA proposed changes

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SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

Industry changes could be coming to indoor tanning salons all across the country, but a local tanning salon isn't worried. The Food and Drug Administration announced this week, a proposal for tighter tanning bed regulations. The new regulations call for tighter rules and putting new cancer warning labels on the beds aimed at minors who use them. The goal is to reduce the risk of skin cancer in teenagers.

But one manager at an Ark-La-Tex tanning salon doesn't think the warnings will keep the teens away from the sun lamps. Endless Summer Tanning in Shreveport sees customers of all ages, looking for that golden glow. "In limited amounts tanning is not bad for

you," said manager Kirra Glenn. But the FDA is worried about teenagers not tanning in limited amounts. That's why it wants to require labels on the beds, discouraging people under the age of 18 from using them. But manager Kirra Glenn says the already posted health warnings are not stopping teens from tanning, making her doubts this new warning will either. "It might encourage some people not to come, but if you want to come and your parents sign for you, you're still going to," said Glenn.

But the FDA is hoping it will make a difference. It says the proposed changes could help reduce cases of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. "So many people are coming in with skin cancers, and it's just way too young to have them," said dermatologist Dr. Joyce Fox. In fact, Doctors say more than 2 million teens tan indoors, and they are 75% more likely to develop cancer than teens who don't. But Glenn says their employees are specially trained to prevent burning and aren't worried and as the summer time approaches, they expect business to continue to heat up.

 The FDA is also proposing changing the classification of tanning beds from low risk to moderate risk, allowing the FDA to review their safety and design before manufacturers can sell them. Any new federal regulations won't be announced for at least 90 days.

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