Drugs worth $1.8 million found in pickup at AZ border - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Drugs worth $1.8 million found in pickup at AZ border

The drugs totaled more than 150 pounds. (Source: Custom and Border Protection) The drugs totaled more than 150 pounds. (Source: Custom and Border Protection)
The drugs and vehicle were seized at the Naco Port of Entry. (Source: Custom and Border Protection) The drugs and vehicle were seized at the Naco Port of Entry. (Source: Custom and Border Protection)
NACO, AZ (CBS5) -

An assortment of drugs worth an estimated $1.8 million was discovered in a pickup as the driver attempted to enter Arizona from Mexico, federal authorities said.

Custom and Border Protection officers referred Emilia Reyes-Balderrama for an additional inspection of her Ford truck at the Naco Port of Entry. 

During the search, officers uncovered nine pounds of heroin valued at an estimated $126,000; nearly 80 pounds of cocaine worth more than $725,000; and almost 64 pounds of methamphetamine valued at nearly $987,000.

The drugs and vehicle were seized. Reyes was turned over to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's Homeland Security Investigations.

Copyright 2013 CBS 5 (KPHO Broadcasting Corporation). All rights reserved.

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