Vandals change A&M coach's name to 'Black Jesus' on Wikipedia - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Vandals change A&M coach's name to 'Black Jesus' on Wikipedia

COLLEGE STATION, TX (KLTV) -

A vandal has made a few questionable modifications to Texas A&M coach Kevin Sumlin's page on the popular reference website Wikipedia.

At least two modifications appear to have been made in the past few hours. In space above his photo where his name would normally appear, the vandal has Sumlin listed as "Black Jesus".

In another spot, the vandal changed Sumlin's job title from "head coach" to "Boss".

An IP address listed on the edit history of Sumlin's page appears to originate from College Station, according to an IP tracking website.

Wikipedia's open policy allows for just about anyone to make a modification to a page. However, administrators on the site usually note and fix any vandalism they are able to find.

As of 5 p.m. local time, Wikipedia administrators have fixed the issue.

Sumlin took the Aggies to a 10-2 regular season record and a 6-2 record in the SEC in 2012.

Copyright 2012 KLTV. All rights reserved.

  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Deadly virus threatens local crawfish industry

    Tuesday, May 23 2017 7:26 PM EDT2017-05-23 23:26:19 GMT

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>

    A deadly virus is threatening the crawfish industry in Southwest Louisiana. It's called white spot syndrome virus and it was first discovered in Thailand, but somehow it made its way to ponds in South Louisiana and specialists are struggling to find the funds to research a solution.  “The catch was increasing and increasing and then it dropped 70% and that's when you saw the dead crawfish floating in the water,” said a crawfish farmer of 34 years, Ian Garbarino. He...

    More >>
Powered by Frankly