Officers learn how to nail drunk drivers - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Officers learn how to nail drunk drivers

SHREVEPORT, LA (KSLA) -

The Caddo Parish Sheriff's Office is hosting sobriety training open to officers from throughout the state. This training is coming right before the holiday season to help train officers how to detect when a driver is impaired.

"Drunk driving is no longer socially acceptable," says Caddo Parish Sheriff Corporal Richard Porter.

The 40 hour field sobriety training prepares officers to administer sobriety test in the field along with learning how to tell when a person is under the influence of a prescription drug.

"Your body doesn't know the difference between Jack Daniels and Zanax, one CMX depressant has the same effects as another," says Porter.

To make the training as real as possible to an actual drunk driving traffic stop the training is using real people and alcohol.

"I've had 7 drinks of Jim Bean," says Volunteer Harris Griffith.

Griffith has taken the field sobriety test more than 5 times, and is able to pass without difficulty even though he is not sober.

Officials say learning how to tell when a person is impaired even when they are coherent is just one of their challenges.

"Until you've done something like this, and you have seen drink by drink, shot by shot, what their movements can do and how they are challenged, you just don't know," says Volunteer Sherri Phillips.

Classes for the officers are expected to wrap up by the end of this week.

 

Copyright 2012 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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