Haughton man arrested in standoff taken to Bossier Max - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Haughton man arrested in standoff taken to Bossier Max

Arrested: Joseph Drozd, 59 (Bossier Parish Sheriff's Office) Arrested: Joseph Drozd, 59 (Bossier Parish Sheriff's Office)
BOSSIER PARISH, LA (KSLA) -

A Haughton man who was arrested Wednesday after holding Bossier Parish sheriff's deputies at bay for nearly two hours during a standoff was transferred Thursday to the Bossier Maximum Security Facility.

Joseph Drozd Jr., 59, has been charged with terrorizing, aggravated battery and resisting arrest by force. No bond has been set.

Drozd's arrest follows an incident in Haughton Wednesday evening when authorities evacuated nearly two dozen houses in the Dogwood neighbood in Haughton.

Deputies said they had received a call from a Dogwood resident who claimed that his neighbor had threatened to blow up his house and that he could smell gas.

After two hours of negotiation, the man surrendered to deputies in his back yard, and residents were allowed to return to their homes.

Drozd was taken to LSU Health for evaluation immediately after the incident for evaluation.

Copyright 2012 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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