ArkLaTex animal shelter turns to social media to save pets - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

ArkLaTex animal shelter turns to social media to save pets

MARSHALL, TX (KSLA) -

Through no fault of their own, dogs and cats all over the country often times end up in shelters. At the animal shelter in Marshall, Texas, overcrowding is becoming a problem. All of the animals there need a place to live, but each day that they are locked up their chance of ever getting out shrinks.

 Shelly Cullum works at the Marshall Animal Shelter, and she says each day as many as 30 animals are dropped off.

"Everyday we fill up, everyday. It's unfortunate that we have to make room," said Cullum. By "make room" Cullum means animals have to be put to sleep; fifteen to twenty a day. The euthanization process is humane.

The animal feels no pain as they drift off to sleep, still Cullum says it takes a toll on the shelter employees. "We cry, you know. We sing. Like I said, it never gets easy."

To cut down on how many potential pets are put down, and to make more room in the cages, Cullum and her staff have come up with a unique way to get the word out.

They are combining the power and reach of social media with the cuddly and lovable pictures that almost no one can resist. Each dog or cat that comes to the shelter makes it onto Facebook. A picture along with a small bio is posted to their page. If you see one you want it is as easy as commenting on the picture.

"With the sharing, and having the friends that share, it's a really good network. It really has helped a lot of them out; to get the word out," Cullum says.

In a digital world where likes, posts and pokes are often trivial, capturing your attention for only a short while, know that your next click could mean a lot more; the difference between life and death for the potential pets at the Marshall Animal Shelter.

Click here for a link to the Marshall Animal Shelter Facebook page.

Copyright 2012 KSLA. All rights reserved.

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