Breast Cancer Center - KSLA News 12 Shreveport, Louisiana News Weather & Sports

Could 'AI' become a partner in breast cancer care?

Machines armed with artificial intelligence may one day help doctors better identify high-risk breast lesions that might turn into cancer, new research suggests.

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Breast cancer more lethal for blacks than whites

Differences in insurance are a major reason why black women are more likely to die of breast cancer than white women in the United States, a new study contends.

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Need cancer screening? Where you work matters

Waiters, contractors and other employees of America's small businesses are more likely to miss out on cancer screening, mostly because of a lack of insurance, new research shows.

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More women choose breast reconstruction after mastectomy

Over five years, the proportion of U.S. breast cancer patients opting for breast reconstruction after mastectomy grew by about two-thirds, a new government report shows.

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Breast cancer screenings still best for early detection

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States, and routine screenings remain the most reliable way to detect the disease early, a breast cancer expert says.

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How breast cancer gene mutations raise risk of tumors

Scientists say they've spotted how mutations in the BRCA1 gene can trigger breast cancer.

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Breast cancer's decline may have saved 322,000 lives

New research finds the number of American women who've lost their lives to breast cancer has fallen precipitously in the past 25 years, with more than 322,000 lives saved in that time.

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Verzenio approved for advanced breast cancer

Verzenio (abemaciclib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat women with certain advanced forms of breast cancer, the most common cancer in the United States.

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Yoga may bring better sleep to breast cancer patients

A certain type of yoga may provide lasting benefits for breast cancer patients who have trouble sleeping, researchers report.

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Surgeons play big role in women's choices for breast cancer care

A breast cancer patient's choice of surgeon can have a major effect on her treatment, according to a new study.

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Managing pain can be a puzzle after breast cancer

Breast cancer patients who take opioid painkillers are more likely to discontinue an important hormone treatment that helps ensure their survival, researchers report.

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'Cancer pen' could help surgeons spot tumor cells in seconds

A new "cancer pen" promises to help surgeons immediately detect and completely remove cancerous tumor tissue, without having to send samples off to a lab for testing while the patient languishes on the table.

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Could urban lighting raise breast cancer risk for some women?

New research reveals an unexpected potential risk factor for breast cancer: city lights.

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Can a blood test detect a range of cancers earlier?

A new genetic blood test might pave the way for detecting early stage cancers that often prove fatal when caught too late, a new study suggests.

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Minority women less likely to get breast cancer screening

Black and Hispanic women are less likely than white women to be screened for breast cancer, a large review finds.

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Could a computer someday guide breast cancer care?

An artificially intelligent computer system is making breast cancer treatment recommendations on a par with those of cancer doctors, a new study reports.

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Taking breast cancer prevention drug beyond 5 years may not raise survival

Many breast cancer survivors take anti-estrogen drugs for at least five years to help lessen their risk of recurrence.

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Worldwide cancer rates up more than one-third in past decade

Cancer cases rose 33 percent worldwide in the past 10 years, a new study shows.

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Why breast cancer survivors should exercise

Excessive stress can lead to memory problems among breast cancer survivors, but exercise can help, according to new research.

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Cheaper breast cancer drug does well in clinical trial

For women with advanced HER2-positive breast cancer, a similar but less expensive experimental drug works just as well as the standard drug Herceptin (trastuzumab), a new study finds.

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Mindfulness meditation seems to soothe breast cancer survivors

Mindfulness meditation seems to help breast cancer patients better manage symptoms of fatigue, anxiety and fear of recurrence, a new study suggests.

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Lifestyle change may cut risk for women with breast cancer genes

Women who carry common gene variants linked to breast cancer can still cut their risk of the disease by following a healthy lifestyle, a large new study suggests.

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Many breast cancer patients try alternative medicine first

Women with early stage breast cancer who turn to alternative medicine may delay recommended chemotherapy, a new study suggests.

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Celebrity cases may help spur rise in double mastectomies

Media coverage of celebrities who battle breast cancer is not always balanced or thorough, and this skewed view may be one factor in the growing popularity of double mastectomies, a new study suggests.

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Evening snacking might raise odds for breast cancer's return

Breast cancer patients fond of midnight snacking may be at a higher risk of a breast cancer recurrence, according to new research.

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With early breast cancer, targeted radiation shows promise

For women with early stage breast cancer, targeted doses of radiation therapy may be as effective as standard radiation treatment of the entire breast, a new British study suggests.

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Girls who eat more fiber may face lower breast cancer risk later

Teenage girls who get plenty of fiber in their diets may have a lower risk of breast cancer later in life, a new, large study suggests.

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For cancer survivors, expenses keep mounting

A cancer diagnosis is costly, and new research suggests that it remains costly even after the disease has been treated.

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New rules for mammograms, tanning beds top health news of 2015

While no one health story dominated in 2015, the year did mark some milestones and important trends, with news in cancer screening and prevention topping the list.

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